sectopdownet-20_contents.txt

Sat, 10 May 2014 18:44:20 +0200

author
Michael Schloh von Bennewitz <michael@schloh.com>
date
Sat, 10 May 2014 18:44:20 +0200
changeset 2
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parent 0
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Expand text, improve wording, and include new relevant topics.

michael@2 1 Securing Internet Freedom from the Top Down
michael@2 2 Michael Schloh von Bennewitz <michael@schloh.com>
michael@2 3 -------------------------------------------------
michael@0 4
michael@2 5 INTRODUCTION
michael@2 6 States like Germany and Brazil, groups like the U.N. formed IGF, and multistakeholder forums like the recent NETmundial have recently embarked on efforts arguably dislodging the Internet from United States grips, serving to transition Internet stewardship from the traditional one-state U.S. institutional governance model.
michael@2 7 But the trouble when thinking of Internet topics like security is that we fail to consider the historical value and soft power the Internet provides. In the same way that the two words 'social' and 'security' lead to larger potential when combined, many are seeing in the Internet technical, educational, business, social, and other values that can fall to risk without adequate protections. An interesting development in Internet history is appearing at a high level including several government and multinational civil groups, seeking to secure the treasure we know as the Internet through legislation and international agreements.
michael@0 8
michael@0 9 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
michael@0 10 BRAZIL'S MARCO CIVIL DA INTERNET (Sequence 1)
michael@0 11 NET MUNDIAL MULTISTAKEHOLDER STATEMENT (Sequence 2)
michael@2 12 When Edward Snowden exposed the collaboration between the governments of the world and the most powerful companies of Silicon Valley, many woke to a democratically engineered Internet paradise lost to industrial special interests and spying groups. Last year, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff condemned this collusion, promising concrete actions and convening the NETmundial forum. A number of other states, industries, and technical groups from civil society, academia, and others were represented as multistakeholders during negociations at the NETmundial meeting in Sao Paulo [1]. The negociated statement included some protections intended to secure basic Internet freedom, but fell short of containing strongly worded language condemning abuses like undemocratic surveillance and failed net neutrality. Most critics pointed to an absence of concrete action as well as the nonbinding nature, which some insisted were compromises needed to keep the negociations from falling apart. But the plight of democracy hungry Internet users worldwide was highlighted repeatedly as NETmundial progressed, with keynote speaker Nnenna Nwakanma closing her speech by thanking Edward Snowden and to thunderous applause [2].
michael@2 13
michael@2 14 [1] http://images.bwbx.io/cms/2014-04-29/0429_NETmundial_970-630x420.jpg
michael@2 15 [2] http://3ehspg3e85cn1oz25ebdof7cd3.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Bl6eLMfCcAA1Jwl.jpg
michael@2 16
michael@2 17 Wikileaks Editor in chief Julian Assange describes motivations at NETmundial. "There is a new international legislative playing field for control of the world and that is the legislative playing field of the Internet." And "the Internet is a new land and there is a land grab at the moment for that new land."
michael@2 18
michael@2 19 INTERNET INDUSTRY SEWING SEEDS OF DISTRUST
michael@2 20 Even while some of the largest technology companies have owed their growth and success to the public Internet and its past freedoms, some seem willing to give the Internet a kick in the knee at times. This has been made apparent by news from The New York Times and Reuters damning the RSA for profiting from NSA tactics like intentional weakening of Internet security systems.
michael@2 21 In fact, for United States technology industry, the fallout from revelations about such technical corruption and despicable surveillance has become a legitimate business problem. Mistrust is certainly a competitive disadvantage for those trying to expand around the world and already meeting resistance in hard to reach but lucrative markets like China and Russia. It's no surprise that industry sent representatives in full force to the NETmundial meeting in order to chart an international course for how the Internet should be managed and what level of freedom, privacy, and security nations and corporations should be able to guarantee.
michael@2 22
michael@0 23 COLLISION COURSE OF SHORT-TERM U.S. INDUSTRIAL INTERESTS (Sequence 3)
michael@0 24
michael@0 25 ACTION PLAN AND GRASSROOTS BACKGROUND
michael@0 26 WHAT WE WANT, ACTIVISM AND POPULAR DISSENT
michael@0 27 TAKING THE NET INTO OWN HANDS
michael@0 28 Geek power serving to channel what people need (strong encryption, secure anonymous communication) and attracting media and political attention.
michael@2 29 [3] https://www.webwewant.org/
michael@2 30 [4] https://www.resetthenet.org/
michael@2 31 [5] https://www.torproject.org/
michael@0 32
michael@0 33 GOVERNANCE STRUCTURES
michael@0 34 ICANN, IGF, ITUT, AND THE UN - CAN IT WORK
michael@0 35 WANING OF THE UNITED STATES INFLUENCE OVER THE NET
michael@0 36 The United States Commerce Department, DARPA, and other U.S. goverment groups have seemingly squandered their grip on the Internet over time. Recent attacks on journalists and whistleblowers, going as far as deliberately weakening the Internet's security in order to commit mass surveillance using it, have alienated many and replaced a sense of awe with distrust. It's no surprise that new Internet governing structures and efforts are putting down roots on foreign soil, with strongly democratic states considering state controlled national Internet registies for the first time.
michael@0 37
michael@2 38 WHAT HIGH LEVEL INTERNET SECURITY LOOKS LIKE
michael@0 39 Setting aside the technical representation of security for a moment, let's imagine where the ongoing governmental and grassroots efforts converge in providing future generations with a strong and vibrant Internet.
michael@0 40 JACOB APPELBAUM'S EXPLANATION OF IMPORTANCE OF FREEDOM, DIGNITY, ANONYMITY, AND INTEGRITY (NOT JUST PRIVACY)
michael@0 41 DISTILLATION OF PORTIONS OF MARCO CIVIL AND NET MUNDIAL NOT OTHERWISE CONSIDERED SECURITY MATTERS
michael@0 42 This isn't a nonsensical fantasy as some who profit from 'attacks on privacy' would plead. Instead, it's a recipe of ingredience found in every household which when demanded by Internet service consumers will force states and industry into doing their jobs. Without these ingredients we're doomed to hand over the keys to the Internet kingdom not to the next generation of developers and consumers but rather to an Industry working for short term value taking us to a paradise lost.

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