Commit initial raw text of resemblance to a distilled Net Mundial report.

Thu, 08 May 2014 19:18:22 +0200

author
Michael Schloh von Bennewitz <michael@schloh.com>
date
Thu, 08 May 2014 19:18:22 +0200
changeset 0
992e66662baa
child 1
480cc9d68880

Commit initial raw text of resemblance to a distilled Net Mundial report.

.hgignore file | annotate | diff | comparison | revisions
sectopdownet-00_abstract.txt file | annotate | diff | comparison | revisions
sectopdownet-20_contents.txt file | annotate | diff | comparison | revisions
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     2.4 +Testing the integrity of US Internet dominance
     2.5 +Michael Schloh von Bennewitz <michael@schloh.com>
     2.6 +-------------------------------------------------
     2.7 +Events concerning unbridled surveillance and digital oppression in the name of state sponsored security enforcement have quite a few groups up in arms. Since the Internet's inception, the keys to the Internet kingdom have been kept in the United States for mostly traditional reasons. This is changing however, as industry, other UN member states, and organizations like UNESCO begin to collaborate in terms of laying a foundation for modern Internet governance.
     2.8 +
     2.9 +The Internet is already managed to some degree by regional authorities like RIPE (Europe), ARIN (North america), LACNIC (Latin america, AfriNIC (Africa), and APNIC (Asia). But ICANN and other similar United States organizations have usually had a great deal of control over them.
    2.10 +
    2.11 +Historically, the United States' influence over the Internet began with it's creation by DARPA in the 1960s, and waned around the time of NSA dragnets and other disgraceful domestic spying in the early 2000s. With public knowlege of Internet freedoms being kicked in the knee, the Internet's open nature strangled by surveillance, as well as commercialization by industry (like social networks erecting barriers or storing human identities) several groups interested in reclaiming the democratic Internet have surfaced.
    2.12 +
    2.13 +Frequent scandals have led Internet management groups (even many in the United States like ICANN) to see the writing on the wall. A handful of organizations addressed misconduct by convening a meeting in late 2013 resulting in the Montevideo Statement on the Future of Internet Cooperation. Governments like Iceland's have responded to abuses of US Internet dominance by integrating protections for whistleblowers and investigative journalists into the country's constitution. But perhaps the boldest step of all came in light of documents alleging that the NSA committed industrial espionage on Brazil's national energy company Petrobras although it was clearly not a security threat.
    2.14 +
    2.15 +Brazil has responded to this and similar attacks partially through legislation providing citizens with a bill of digital rights called the Marco Civil da Internet. The creator of the World Wide Web Sir Tim Berners-Lee gave his symbolic approval to the bill, stating that Brazil would "usher in a new era - one where citizens' rights in every country around the world are protected by digital bills of rights." The Marco Civil, or 'constitution for the Internet' as known by some, was overwelmingly passed by the Brazilian Congress.
    2.16 +
    2.17 +In fact, several governments have recognized the value of a democratic Internet in these terms. Brazillian President Dilma Rousseff and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have led international efforts to limit mass electronic surveillance, and Brazil will host a global conference on the future of Internet governance in April 2014 (this month.) Two dozen countries as well as groups like UNESCO and industry will take part to shape the Internet's future.
    2.18 +
    2.19 +But this seemingly easy path to a more democratic Internet is paved with the carcasses of efforts at taming the Internet's wilder side, and some of these efforts have been dubious in nature. Security expert Bruce Schneier remarks that while Brazil's response to NSA spying is rational, it is likely to embolden "some of the worst countries out there to seek more control over their citizens' Internet." Russia, China, Iran and Syria could redouble their efforts at manipulating or blocking democratic guarantees of speech and citizens' ability to publish content.
    2.20 +
    2.21 +Notwithstanding, each new indicator linking United States' waning Internet dominance with rogue policy and destruction of hard won information freedom puts wind in the sails of groups seeking renewed freedom from Internet surveillance and other abuse.
    2.22 +
    2.23 +Even industry has taken notice of this and moved towards isolation, increasingly choosing local network, storage, and service providers. Common sense is testing the integrity of United States Internet dominance, and just how long it can maintain its grip on the Internet while other governments take collaborative action may not be under its control. Without a radical policy change, future generations inside and outside the United States may consider Internet history a paradise lost.
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     3.4 +Securing Internet Values from the Top Down
     3.5 +Michael Schloh von Bennewitz, michael@schloh.com
     3.6 +------------------------------------------------
     3.7 +
     3.8 +PREAMBLE
     3.9 +  The trouble when thinking of Internet topics like security is that we fail to consider the historical value and soft power the Internet provides. In the same way that the two words 'social' and 'security' lead to larger potential when combined, many are seeing in the Internet technical, educational, business, social, and other values that can fall to risk without adequate protections. An interesting development in Internet history is appearing at the level of governments, seeking to secure the treasure we know as the Internet through legislation and international agreements.
    3.10 +
    3.11 +RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
    3.12 +  BRAZIL'S MARCO CIVIL DA INTERNET (Sequence 1)
    3.13 +  NET MUNDIAL MULTISTAKEHOLDER STATEMENT (Sequence 2)
    3.14 +  COLLISION COURSE OF SHORT-TERM U.S. INDUSTRIAL INTERESTS (Sequence 3)
    3.15 +
    3.16 +ACTION PLAN AND GRASSROOTS BACKGROUND
    3.17 +  WHAT WE WANT, ACTIVISM AND POPULAR DISSENT
    3.18 +  TAKING THE NET INTO OWN HANDS
    3.19 +    Geek power serving to channel what people need (strong encryption, secure anonymous communication) and attracting media and political attention.
    3.20 +    [1] https://www.webwewant.org/
    3.21 +    [2] https://www.resetthenet.org/
    3.22 +    [3] https://www.torproject.org/
    3.23 +
    3.24 +GOVERNANCE STRUCTURES
    3.25 +  ICANN, IGF, ITUT, AND THE UN - CAN IT WORK
    3.26 +  WANING OF THE UNITED STATES INFLUENCE OVER THE NET
    3.27 +    The United States Commerce Department, DARPA, and other U.S. goverment groups have seemingly squandered their grip on the Internet over time. Recent attacks on journalists and whistleblowers, going as far as deliberately weakening the Internet's security in order to commit mass surveillance using it, have alienated many and replaced a sense of awe with distrust. It's no surprise that new Internet governing structures and efforts are putting down roots on foreign soil, with strongly democratic states considering state controlled national Internet registies for the first time.
    3.28 +
    3.29 +WHAT FUTURE SECURITY LOOKS LIKE
    3.30 +  Setting aside the technical representation of security for a moment, let's imagine where the ongoing governmental and grassroots efforts converge in providing future generations with a strong and vibrant Internet.
    3.31 +  JACOB APPELBAUM'S EXPLANATION OF IMPORTANCE OF FREEDOM, DIGNITY, ANONYMITY, AND INTEGRITY (NOT JUST PRIVACY)
    3.32 +  DISTILLATION OF PORTIONS OF MARCO CIVIL AND NET MUNDIAL NOT OTHERWISE CONSIDERED SECURITY MATTERS
    3.33 +  This isn't a nonsensical fantasy as some who profit from 'attacks on privacy' would plead. Instead, it's a recipe of ingredience found in every household which when demanded by Internet service consumers will force states and industry into doing their jobs. Without these ingredients we're doomed to hand over the keys to the Internet kingdom not to the next generation of developers and consumers but rather to an Industry working for short term value taking us to a paradise lost.

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